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The entire mountain of Ait is a decoy.  Kagym the dragon became tired of all those heroes and adventurers trying to kill him and take his treasure bedding. Notionally Kagym resides in a cave at the peak of Ait. This cave is several miles of looping tunnels that form a nondescript maze of curves and backstracks. The entrance is glamoured so as to be hidden from those inside the maze. Kagym pays some kobolds to sweep the it clean of corpses once a quarter.  The dragon is actually hibernating underneath derelict log cabin in a nearby wood where the only thing that bothers him is the occasional nesting bird.

The coins of Ulune are small tetrahedrons of bronze and brass.  There were once discs until the war of the three fools. The three challengers were vain and petty princes unable to share or compromise their mother’s legacy.  The lengthy war ended when the peasants rose up in rebellion against all three.  Bitter fighting was replaced by unpleasant negotiation.  The solution was a triple monarchy, with the princes acting as a three member crown council as heads of state for an elected parliament.  To satisfy the royal egos, the tetrahedral coins were minted so that each prince would have a coin face to themselves that was equal to their rivals.

Beneath Castle Granfuss is a dungeon of cunning design.  Lord Riethhook has a unique take on punishment: those found guilty of crimes in his realm are sentenced to attempt to escape the dungeon, armed only with their underwear.  If they can survive the traps and monsters then freedom is theirs.  The deeper floors of the dungeon contain greater dangers for those who’ve committed more heinous crimes. Taking advantage of adventuring skill to repeatedly commit crimes will see a criminal sentenced to increasingly deeper floors.


Image Credit – Mountains by Abdul Rahman – CC-BY-2.0

Source: https://6d6rpg.com/2017/04/22/short-seeds-rpgs-mountain-dungeon/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=short-seeds-rpgs-mountain-dungeon

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2 thoughts on “Short Seeds for RPGs – Mountain and Dungeon

  1. I have been a lifelong fan of the horror genre. Some of my earliest memories are the old black and white Universal monster movies, comics from the EC era, and the edited-for-TV versions of Tales From The Crypt. As I grew up I embraced everything from slasher movies, to cosmic horror, and did my best to sample every subgenre in between.

    An issue I keep running into is that whenever I try to get folks interested in playing a horror RPG (or adding horror elements to something not strictly a horror game) is that it feels like there are so few people who have a nuanced understanding of the genre, or even what it can be.

    One of the more fruitless discussions I tried to have was with someone who refused, as they didn't care for Hostel or Saw. To them, that's all horror was; just gore and torture meant to squick out the audience. Another friend of mine dismissed horror games entirely because they were under the impression that all horror has to be about powerlessness, and that wasn't a kind of game they wanted to play.

    I do my best to try to explain things. To share different media, to get into all the shades of gray about what horror can be, and how there's more flavors than “gratuitous torture” and “monsters so powerful you cannot hope to stand against them”. From body horror, to themes of paranoia and loss of self, to psychological thriller (a genre invented solely so the Academy wouldn't have to give a Best Picture award to a horror film), there are so many different options out there.

    And even when I do manage to find fellow gamers who are down for a horror game, it's equally possible that what they want and what I want aren't going to mesh up. A lot of the time even self-professed fans of the genre just kind of assume that anything goes, which can lead to frustrations (and it's why I make sure to have conversations before agreeing to join any games).

    There's no real point to this, other than it's frustrating having the same conversations over and over again with different people. Horror has always been a maligned genre (often for good reason, no disagreement there), but it can be depressing trying to share a thing you love with people who are determined to misunderstand it.

  2. It was a tough session. Your plucky band of merry muderhobos nearly cleared the Crypt of the Trap-o-Mancer, but that last flight of poisoned arrows was one trap too many. Bob’s bard bled out within sight of the exit. There was much weeping, a somber burial scene, and the traditional looting of the corpse. “Dibs on the Knife”

    So there you are a week later, happily prepping your session notes when a MyFace notification pops up. And in a raspy voice from beyond the grave, Bob’s bard whispers those fateful words: “Wait! I had cover.”

    In the wider world of gaming, there are certain phrases that cover this situation. “You took your hand off the piece!” and “A card laid is a card played!” both spring to mind. If the initiative has moved on through another couple of turns, and especially if the session ended yesterweek, the natural response is to shrug your shoulders and say, “That sucks, but it already happened.” The other option is to declare a full retcon, but breaking the integrity of the game world always rankles. That leaves us with the other other option, which generally lies in the land of narrative shenanigans, e.g. “You wake up in a pinewood box. Roll to attack the coffin lid”

    Here’s today’s discussion question for you guys: In your opinion, what’s best practice here? Is there a statute of limitations on fixing rules errors after the fact? Adjusting a few errant hit points might not be a big deal, but saying that Bob’s bard’s funeral never happened is a bit of stretch. So how would you handle it? You missed a rule, the PC died, and now you’ve got to figure out some way to move forward. Let’s hear about your preferred retcon strategies down in the comments!

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