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Gain as free a movement as you need with these three items from the Year of the Angry Lynx’s Highmoor Dungeon Expo.

The best and hottest new magic items from  this year’s Highmoor Dungeon Expo chosen by our reporter Aurora Valentine

No-Tunnel Helm

I’m not sure how the Ardent Cape Geological Society were able to afford the sizeable stand they occupied in Hall B but I’m very glad they were there. Tucked away at the rear, behind a seemingly endless display of slightly magical rocks they had a stall of surveying equipment. Amongst the precisely shaped trowels and measuring tape I came across an unsightly looking helm.  Don’t be put off by the looks as you won’t be needing to wear it on the promenade. Instead, you’ll be wearing it so that you can move through solid rock. The geomage there was prattling on about the incredible geodes she’d found but all I could think about was sneaking into dungeons and taking shortcuts in caves.

Floating Ladder by Shattergranite

There’s not much I can really say about this to make it seem fascinating. It’s a ladder that’s been balanced so that it always stays upright, even when placed on a fluid. Something like the would have been really useful when Aspagex and I got lost in Weatherfort’s sewers last year. Gagnigaer Shattergranite is the stoic dwarf who makes and sells the ladders. She seems something of a carpentry auteur and the only thing I could get her talking about was woodworking. Apparently the secret of the ladders is the careful selection of the wood. Only very specific pines can be carved into a floating ladder and Shattergranite spends months of the year in the southern forests looking for trees that match her criteria.  Available by mail order only.

Hired Heels

Don’t have the carrying capacity to carry your knock outed friend out of the dread castle to safety? Put a pair of these on their feet and they’ll do the walking for you. The cheapest model sold by OrangeTech only have a very basic follow setting, which guides the wearer along a few feet behind you. Premium features are activated for a limited time by inserting coins into the provided slots. Currently this selection includes voice control, hazard avoidance and memorized paths. OrangeTech offer a subscription payment plan for frequent users. The heels won’t function with an aware subject as this causes a painful neural feedback on the legs. This isn’t something that OrangeTech openly acknowledged, instead burying it amongst a long list of indemnities in the end user license agreement.


Aurora Valentine is a staff and features writer for Adventurer’s Monthly. She wields the great sword Requiem, detests oozes and plays the lute badly.


Image Credits

Source: https://6d6rpg.com/2019/02/20/hot-picks-highmoor-dungeon-expo-part-5/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=hot-picks-highmoor-dungeon-expo-part-5

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3 thoughts on “Hot Picks from Highmoor Dungeon Expo – Part 5

  1. I’m gathering a group of players with little to no experience in rpgs and I want a good universal system so that we can do multiple genres with the one system should we want. My question is there a good universal system that can give them easy to learn rules that’ll let them get creative

  2. I've been interested in a DM brainstorming tool, something that throws prompts, questions, or ideas at me WHILE worldbuilding to help get the creative juices flowing.

    WorldAnvil seems to be the best tool for this, as they have template prompts built in. But I'm unsure if this will suit exactly my needs, or if the prompts are even useful or helpful.

    I'm looking to flesh out more ideas around a published campaign setting to better suit the needs of my existing campaign.

  3. Like most people who got into the hobby in recent years DnD 5e was my first rpg experience. I have a friend who was also relatively new to the hobby at the time and he convinced me to play. I played in his campaign for about a year but outside of that haven't played much DnD and moved on to other games.

    I’m not especially into generic, Tolkien derivative, kitchen sink, medieval fantasy. I generally prefer games that deliver a more specific experience. Eiher a high concept like Vampire The Masquarade or a unique experience like Exalted or Age of Sigmar Soulbound. So even though I prefer gming to playing I’ve never bothered to run DnD at all.

    I’ve played a lot of games since my friends campaign and only really picked up Pathfinder because I hoped to create my own game some day based on the D20 system and wanted to steal elements such as the three action economy. The D20 system is well-worn and very combat focused so even though it’s not a system I have a ton of experience with I don’t have an issue with the system itself and I figure it would be an easier sell if I use it. Furthermore I find combat enjoyable in DnD but tedious at higher levels do to the amount of health everyone generally has. The math tends to collapse at highers of play. I have heard Pathfinder doesn't have this problem and was curious to see how it fixes it even though I don't intend to have players level past 10 in my game.

    I ran the first session of the Beginner’s Box with three players and it was great. I typically scoff at running premade adventures but didn't feel the need to create an adventure for a system I was just trying to get a feel for. While I think the system is more complicated then it needs to be it wasn’t especially frustrating to run. I used Foundry VTT which probably helped a lot. I would probably never play the game live, but I’ve never had the chance to play in-person game anyway. It really isn’t as intimidating as I thought it would be. If I had tried during my first year of playing rpgs I probably would have struggled but I don’t see how it could be that difficult for someone whose played DnD for years. I was able to run it and I’ve only had at most 30 sessions of DnD experience.

    People mockingly call it Mathfinder but the Math isn't where the complication comes from. It's still only basic addition and subtraction and the number of variables you are adding up compared to DnD is barely worth mentioning. It's really just a matter of memorizing all the rules which are all pretty intuitive on their own but taken as a whole is a lot to remember. It's not that the flanking, stealth and cover rules are complicated it's just remembering those rules when they all come into play all at once that things get a little tricky I think.

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