Help with my assignment!
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Give your druid or ranger an animal companion with a bit more character and colour to them.

Rainbow Lyrebird

The mottled brown plumage of this huge songbird only serves to enhance the colours of the long rainbow tail feathers. It prefers to stay on the ground in the forests it inhabits as it forages for insects and fungi but it’s small wings do allow it to gracelessly fly and glide. They have a beautiful and diverse range of songs but what makes it particularly prized is that they are perfect mimics. This includes being able to recite songs of magical power which appear to be particularly powerful against evil. Taming a Rainbow Lyrebird requires pandering to an arrogant personality but once accustomed to a trainer they’re quite lazy if kept fed.

Bladed Harrier

The metal grasslands are known for the presence of metal in flora and fauna. The dull brown camouflage plumage serves to highlight that the outer four flight feathers on each wing are sword steel. The wings are just under 2 metres in length, longer than is normal for the genus to accommodate for the metal. The Bladed Harrier uses its amazing eyesight to spot prey for the glide before swooping in and using the wing blades to kill. As a companion the bird is distant and adversarial so they take significant time to befriend and train. They will slice with the wing blades if angered. If you’re willing to be patient and accept cut fingers the bird can be taught to fence and parry.

Chaos Ferret

Ferrets love tunnels and chaos ferrets love tunnels through the fabric of reality. A wiggle here and a crawl there and there’s an infinite number of places to nap or snack on anything that’ll fit in its jaws. As befits their place outside of the ordered planes, no two chaos ferrets look the same. Generally about 50 cm long, their soft fur is a patchwork of every colour of the rainbow with eyes like prismatic marbles. If you can find one they are quite friendly and enjoy sentient contact and affection. Once per day they can flip you luck provided you don’t mind it flipping back the other way the next day.

Trueblack Crow

Shadows within shadows on the wing. A barking call that seems to come from nowhere. Only when fully exposed to the light does the plumage of this small corvid reveal itself in outline. The feathers of the Trueblack Crow are utterly and completely black, reflecting none of the light that falls on them. The effect is tied to the shadow soul of the bird itself so the feathers turn a dusty grey when shed. A stealthy and intelligent scavenger, it does well in the shadows found in cities. Be exceptionally careful when approaching a Trueblack Crow as they have an additional surprise. To prevent themselves from overheating, they can spew forth a streak of plasma up to 15 m long.

Null Capybara

100 kg of peace and calm, distinguished from its brethren by the interlocking circular patterns of their gold and brown fur. When not gently eating vegetables or bugs, Null Capybara like to find sunny places to sit and watch the world. The rodent cultivates such a measure of tranquility that it radiates as an aura for up to 50 metres. The area around it becomes calm and quiet, a place where fears and anxieties can be put into perspective and difficult problems seem easier to tackle.

Source: https://6d6rpg.com/2021/06/03/5-magical-animal-companions-for-your-druid/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=5-magical-animal-companions-for-your-druid

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3 thoughts on “5 Magical Animal Companions for your Druid

  1. I need a list of typical complaints related to playing rpgs either as a player or narrator for an idea I’m developing.

    I will start with some examples and hope that you guys can add to it! It is meant as system neutral.

    “My players find the campaign boring…”

    “Combat is too slow…”

    “Player X is not engaged…”

    “My players don’t fear anything…”

    “My players think I’m their adversary…”

  2. TL;DR How would you implement roguelike mechanics in a TTRPG? Have you played any system that has those mechanics in it?

    So my GM and I had a discussion about implementing roguelike mechanics into a one shot we are planning to run together for our group. We currently play D&D 5e but we'd gladly try new games or systems. We raised a few questions we think are relevant for this sort of game, some we answered and some are still open for discussion.

    Firstly – why roguelike? Well, all of the gamers in the group love roguelike games, and we would love to evoke the same feeling of failing and failing and failing again, but within each failure lies a small improvement. The feeling of achieving new and strong powers, as though you played a whole campaign in a 1-2 sessions one shot.

    What can we keep after each death? What will we leave behind? We thought about going in either one of 2 ways: 1) use the D&D 5e level system, just level up much MUCH faster, and keep the exp from one death to the next, and having danger / challenge curve of the dungeon be steep. Any equipment you get will be randomised during the run (from tables we'll create specifically for the party). 2) Create a progression tree, with feats (some from the game, some we'll create), either specified for each character or a generalized and wide one that would let the players personalize their character with their choices on this tree. New feats can be unlocked by finding special items on the dungeon, or defeating mini-bosses.

    Would we penalize players for dying too much? Can we put a max deaths count before they completely perish? How would we encourage safe play, what would be at stakes when dying? We thought about using a system that is close to what there is in Situ – on each death you get older, which means you lose max hp but you hit harder. We haven't gotten to thinking about it mechanically yet.

    What are your thoughts? Why would / wouldn't you want to play a roguelike TTRPG? Do you know any that you enjoyed playing? What other questions should we ask ourselves to get a direction for this game?

  3. Before I begin, no, I am not a serial killer. I am simply curious as to how an RPG would implement this.

    So some months back I got interested in biopunk, a genre about biotechnology, which I took to mean “everything is organic”.

    Basically, anything mechanical in our world is represented by something organic, like a computer made of a jellyfish for a screen, an animal brain for a CPU, rows of teeth for a keyboard, etc. which is all well and good for the worldbuilding, but what about gameplay?

    So for example, if I kill an enemy with a large fire-breathing salamander for an arm, I can then slice/chop off that limb and graft it onto me. Now that I have a third arm in the shape of a salamander (because that is exactly what it is) how would I balance this? If left unchecked, I could rip off every limb I come across and have 18 pairs of arms and 4 pairs of legs, turning me into a human Sleipnir. I imagine that would be horribly intimidating, even in a world with bizarre and horrific fusions everywhere.

    Any ideas for balance? Or games that have this idea? Imagine the game Spore but with limb and organ grafting.

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